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No Bake Cookies

No Bake Cookies

Have you ever heard of no bake cookies? They’re pretty self explanatory, cookies that require no baking before they are ready to enjoy. It’s like getting to lick the bowl without getting scolded by mom.

Generally what makes no bake cookies work is a thick base that requires no eggs. Things like peanut butter, oats or graham crackers typically serve to keep the cookie together without needing to bake.

Here’s a favorite recipe for quick, no bake cookies!


2 cups sugar
1⁄2 cup milk
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1⁄3 cup cocoa
1⁄4 lb softened butter
1 teaspoon vanilla

1⁄2 cup peanut butter
3 cups oatmeal (instant)

Directions
Mix first 6 ingredients in a saucepan and cook until it boils.
Boil for 1-3 minutes.
Remove from heat and add peanut butter and oatmeal. Drop by teaspoonfuls on to wax paper.
Chill until set.

Try it out and let us know what you think!

The History of Shortbread

The History of Shortbread

Have you ever enjoyed the dense delicacy that is shortbread cookies? Did you know they originated in Scotland and could date back to the 12th century? These traditional cookies have a high butter content and traditionally had a recipe of one part sugar, two parts butter and three parts flour. The more modern recipes include dipping them in chocolate or other delicious glazes or creating different shapes to fit the occasion. If you’ve never made shortbread cookies now is as good a time as any. They are simple to make and could quickly become a staple in your baking repertoire. Try out this recipe from Martha Stewart!

 

INGREDIENTS
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan
2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon coarse salt
1/2 cup confectioners' or granulated sugar

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter an 8 1/2-inch round cake or springform pan. Sift together flour and salt in a small bowl. In a large bowl, with an electric mixer on medium, cream butter until fluffy, 3 to 5 minutes. Add sugar, and continue to beat until very light in color and fluffy, scraping down sides of bowl as necessary, about 2 minutes more. Add flour mixture, and beat on low, scraping bowl if necessary, until flour is just incorporated and dough sticks together when squeezed.
Pat dough into prepared pan. Use a paring knife to score dough into wedges; prick all over in even intervals with a wooden skewer or fork.
Bake until firm in the center and just starting to color, about 50 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack, and let cool completely. Cut into wedges. Cookies will keep, in an airtight container, at room temperature 3 weeks.

Butter vs. Olive Oil

Butter vs. Olive Oil

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What’s the difference?

Butter and olive oil are two of the most used ingredients in the kitchen. It would be hard to find a common household that doesn’t have these two cooking must haves. Although they are simple ingredients they manage to elevate dishes seamlessly and we have much heartier meals because of them!  Here are a couple differences between butter and olive oil and different ways you can use each of them.

The Differences between the Two

Butter is made from fat and protein found in milk. Typically we use the milk of a cow to make butter but you can use sheep or goat milk as well. It is made by churning fresh cream or milk. There are many types of butter including, but not limited to, salted, unsalted, grass-fed, clarified butter, and cultured butter. Butter can be stored in the refrigerator to keep it cool or hard, or it can be left at room temperature to stay soft. If you do leave your butter at room temperature you want to be sure to use a Butter Bay so your butter doesn’t go rancid!

Butter is often preferred for recipes that need creaming because it is thicker and will take better. Also if you are baking something like croissants or cake butter is typically favored!

Olive oil is the fat that is retrieved from the olive. Olives are a fruit grown on trees and these trees are now grown throughout the world, although they are native to the Mediterranean. The olives are harvested from the trees and pressed to extract the olive oil. You will normally see olive oil labeled as “virgin” or “extra virgin” which refers to how much that olive oil has been processed.  Olive oil is stored in a dry dark place and is not refrigerated.

Olive oil is used more often when you can’t or don’t want to include dairy in your meal. Also if you are looking for a lighter alternative to butter, so if you are making a salad veggies olive oil may be the way to go!

Those are a few of the main differences between the two! Which one do you prefer using when you are cooking and baking?